Looking to list your game with us? First search for it, and if you find it, claim it. If it's not already added, go ahead and add it yourself! (requires account registration).

Armageddon

Armageddon

Hot
 
3.2 (9)
1648   0   1   3
 
Write Review

Connection Info:

www.armageddon.org (64.252.79.51) port 4050

Zalanthas: a harsh low-technology desert where settlements and shelter are few and far between, and once you're within the walls, you may not actually be any safer. 


In the city-state of Allanak, governed by the ruthless sorcerer king Tektolnes, the common rabble struggle to eke out a living under the strangling boot of the city's nobility. Criminals are put to death 
for the masses' amusement, and elementalists with arcane, unpredictable powers are allowed to walk the streets, so long as they wear the gem, a mysterious device of the Highlord Tektolnes' 
divising. To the north, in the magick-free city-state of Tuluk, the all-knowing Sun King Muk Utep rules with despotism cloaked as benevolence. His Templars are the city's arbiters, and while the city 
is no less brutal than Allanak, those who stray on the wrong side of the law usually vanish without a trace. 

Across the desert of the Known World, bands of nomadic humans and xenophobic elves dot the rest of the map. The Great Merchant Houses of Salarr, Kadius, and Kurac traverse the world for trade, 
maintaining cutthroat monopolies and a lethal grip on their markets. 

Yet in spite of the numerous threats that will await your character at every twist and turn, you will find a niche for yourself in the world of Zalanthas. 

Over two decades old Armageddon MUD is as addictive for its harsh desert theme as it is for its beautifully written environment, and intense, required roleplay. Real-time interaction with multiple 
players around the world will draw you into this world and offer you a gaming experience you will never forget. 

 

MUDs

Codebase
Codebase Details
Heavily Modified
MUD Theme Details
Struggle for survival on a dying desert planet; strong Dark Sun influence.
Created Date
September 01, 1991
Average Online
MultiPlaying Allowed?
No
Player Killing Allowed?
Yes, Open PvP
Number of Starting Races
How many races does your game have that new players/accounts can select from?
4
Number of Advanced Races
How many races does your game have that need to be unlocked somehow, and are not available for new players/accounts?
3
Number of Starting Classes
How many classes does your game have that new players/accounts can select from?
6
Number of Advanced Classes
How many classes does your game have that need to be unlocked somehow, and are not available for new players/accounts?
52
Multiclassing?
No
Level-less System?
Yes
Class-less System?
No
Equipment Saved?
Yes
Character Approval Required?
Yes
ANSI Color?
Yes
Role Play Model
Role Play Enforced (RPI)
Character Progression System
Based on Character's Skill
Equipment System
Skill
Clans Offered?
Yes
Pay to Play?
100% Free
Crafting System?
Custom
Player Run Cities?
No
Conquest System Offered?
No
Screen Reader Friendly?
Partially
World Originality
All Original
Number of Rooms in Open Zones
20001
Game Maps
Offline / Web Site
Adult Oriented?
Is your game geared towards adult in any of the following criterion?
Generally Adult Oriented

Photos

Armageddon

User reviews

9 reviews

 
(1)
 
(4)
3 stars
 
(0)
 
(6)
1 star
 
(0)
Already have an account? or Create an account
View all reviews View most helpful
Overall rating 
 
1.8
Game Mechanics 
 
2.0
Feature Set 
 
2.0
Game World 
 
4.0
Community 
 
0.5
Staff 
 
0.5
Role Play 
 
2.0

I'm not the only thing showing it's age...

Game mechanics and features:
When the game was young, the features were great and superior to those offered by other games. It's been a lot of years now and having come and gone from the game for over twenty years, as well as spent some time on other games that wax and wane in popularity, I've got to admit that the the game isn't aging well at all.

There's some re-hashing and cleaning up of old features, but nothing new that competes with games like Labmud or even SoI. The latest huffing and puffing is about guild changes, but as far as I'm able to tell, they aren't actually doing something new with this, they're just watering what already exists down to provide more, but weaker choices. The magick system not only hasn't seen new functionality, but it's actually been downsized and diminished from what it used to be.

Neglect isn't enough for those who mismanage the game, they've got to strip it down, too.

Game world:
There isn't as much of it as there used to be, but contrary to what a lot of these reviews tell you, there is still a lot to see out there. I knew a lot of the people who made those zones, wrote those descriptions and imagined up those cultures. They're long gone from the game now, but I know they, like myself, would be happy to know there are still people out there seeing and exploring them.

Community:
Skip the general discussion board, it was always a craphole and it's only fermented with time.

Staff:
It used to be the staff existed to engage with players and make the game interesting. Now, it's nothing but a bunch of middle management types that haven't got an ounce of imagination to share between them. I'm amazed beyond all measure at how they can take something as rich with opportunities for fun and choke the life out of it, all while patting themselves on the back at a job well done.

Role Play:
There's still some good RP to be found, but like everything else that once made the game fun, it gets harder to find every time I give it another go.

It's hard not to feel old when talking about the game, so maybe it's time to stop.

Was this review helpful to you? 
Overall rating 
 
2.4
Game Mechanics 
 
2.5
Feature Set 
 
2.5
Game World 
 
5.0
Community 
 
0.5
Staff 
 
3.0
Role Play 
 
1.0

Not horrible, just disappointing.

I tried my best to set a fair score for each category but I'm not going to restrict myself to writing within those categories because I'm not a big fan of review breakdowns. If you excuse my language I'm a big fan of the shit sandwich style of writing feedback. In other words if you must criticize something then stick your criticism (the shit) between two nice things (bread? mmm). Anyway, no more cussing. Let's begin.

BREAD SLICE ONE

Armageddon bills itself as a roleplaying intensive game. Its tagline is "Murder, Corruption, Betrayal". It is set in the harsh desert world of Zalanthas where you can't even get a drink of water for free. The documentation is extensive. So extensive, in fact, you likely won't be able to read it in one day, or three, or ten. This is not a bad thing. The more fleshed out the game world is the better it tends to be. Clearly Armageddon benefits from being over 25 years old as it has had all that time to form, and reform, and define itself. The idea of Armageddon is extremely good and extremely sound. It has a lot of potential, and undoubtedly hundreds if not thousands of people have found Armageddon fun at one point or another.

Creating a character is relatively easy. There are lots of resources available to a new player, including sample characters, a walkthrough, the helper system and the General Discussion Board. Picking a guild and subguild is easy. Writing a background is pretty easy provided you understand you are writing a Level 1 character here. Keep those origins humble.

Then you enter the game. There's a newbie tutorial that's helpful if Armageddon's your first MUD. There's a pre-game shopping area where you can gear your character up before they head out into the harsh world. Allanak, here I come!

THE ... POOP

This is where the disappointment starts to set in. You start in the local tavern's dormitory and wander into the bar. You're looked at. You try to introduce yourself. There's several people at the bar to introduce yourself to. And... nothing.

It's not like I'm talking to NPCs here. These are PCs. They're talking to each other. They're just too busy to talk to me. One of them is trying to get laid. The other is trying to play hard-to-get. The third is looking for an elf to beat up. The last one is wearing a hood indoors and is keeping to themselves. One or two of them look at you, sure. But they don't respond. They don't try to inquire further.

It's fine. I'll just give a prompt. "I'm looking to join the Byn, who can I sign up with?" The Byn is a mercenary group and the recommended clan for new players. I'm hoping that by the grace of God there is a Bynner in the tavern willing to recruit me right then and there. Wouldn't that be lucky? I can play a mercenary and learn about this deep game with some in-character friends.

Then I get my first response. "Sign? What do you mean by sign?" someone asks. Then it hits me. The stupid little thing I had forgotten. Most people in Zalanthas are illiterate. They can't read or write. In fact, for most people, it is a crime to read or write. So I try to correct myself via the out-of-character command to try to explain that my character wouldn't say "sign", that they would know people can't write, that he can't write, and he would use a different word like "join". "Sorry, I meant to say join!"

The response I got was out-of-character: "You said sign so roll with it."

Roll with it. Roll with it how? I made a genuine mistake as a newbie. I tried to tell them that I was a new player and made a mistake and would appreciate if it was just ignored this one time.

"Sorry but no. In-character actions have in character consequences," was the response I got. Generally, this is a philosophy I can agree with. However, these are my first few minutes into the game. Making such a simple mistake in my first few minutes of play, surely, was forgivable? Apparently not this time.

I hate to admit it but at this point I started to shake at my keyboard. All those hours reading the documentation and crafting a character, and my character could be arrested or even killed for saying "sign up" instead of "join" within the first few minutes of play. I moved my mouse over to the X on my MUD client and closed out. I'll try again tomorrow, I thought.

And, yes, I logged in the day after. People were, again, at the bar. I tried to introduce myself. "You were the guy that said sign up last week right?" By last week they meant the RL day before (1 week in-game is 1 day RL). Some completely different character remembered that I had made a mistake yesterday, although this was a week ago in-game, so this character had the words "sign up" in his thoughts for over a week.

I tried to work past it, then I closed my MUD client again. This time, I decided to spend time with my kids. I'll try again tomorrow, I thought.

I did not try again the next day.

Trying to ask for help was a nightmare. Between the spammy Discord, the unfriendly forum and the unresponsive live helper chat I could not get a word in edgewise. My introduction to the community was piss-poor and frankly I didn't expect it to get better than that.

BREAD SLICE TWO

It's nice that these features are there. It's nice that some players will be able to find them useful. It's nice that I got my character approved within minutes. It's nice that so many people are so passionate about Armageddon. Maybe I could give it another try sometime. Right now though I just don't feel up to it.

Was this review helpful to you? 
Overall rating 
 
1.7
Game Mechanics 
 
2.0
Feature Set 
 
3.0
Game World 
 
1.0
Community 
 
0.5
Staff 
 
1.5
Role Play 
 
2.0

Mediocre but not worth sticking around for it

Background:
I played Armageddon for about a year. Before that I was a staff member in Shadows of Isildur.

Game mechanics:
Armageddon as an RPI takes a hit with the stock game mechanics often found in hack and slash games. The rigid choice of which guild your character is does not offer a wide range of customization that would be expected in an immersive game. Compared to similar games like Shadows of Isildur, Harshlands, Sindome, or Arx MUSH, Armageddon is severely lacking with its lack of a skill-based character generation system. This leaves the mechanics at a mediocre level at best.

Feature set:
The game seems to run on a DIKU codebase with features added on. The nice thing about DIKU is that it's familiar, on account of how popular it is in the MUD world. The programmers who work on the game seem very active but the game seems to have taken a hit with a couple of losses on staff.

One of the best features of the game is its emote system, which allows for the player to target other players and items with various symbols like ~, !, and more to print their short description out in the way they would see it. So if you do "emote nods to ~man" most people will see " nods to the tall, muscular man", but the tall, muscular man will see " nods to you". Very immersive.

Game World:
The game world is very hyped up as being a harsh desert. However resources are practically infinite once you know how to get them. This leads to the harshness of the world being mostly imaginary (with few exceptions such as super-strong mobs outside the city). The city of Allanak is an interesting setting at first but once you realize there are no other options it becomes very confining. I would have liked to see Tuluk, which has more documentation for it than Allanak, but is unfortunately closed for play.

Community:
Unfortunately the community is not very good. Those who have posted reviews saying it is good are in the in-crowd of the community and probably see it from a different perspective. From the perspective of a player who has been around for almost a year compared to many who have been around five, ten years or more it is clear that the community is broken into tiers. Newbies are constantly ignored both in game and out unless they make an effort to please veteran players in some way. I was outright told that my character was refused a promotion because I did not consent to erotic roleplay with my character's boss. I have asked questions and been ignored or told to be quiet.

Staff:
Following what was said above about the community, the staff tend to protect veterans and themselves and look at newbies as potential threats or alt accounts. While many do their duty seemingly quickly (Akariel, Nergal, Xalle, Cayuga, Shalooonsh) most others are slow to respond. The community tends to like staff that interfere the least, and by interfere they mean surprise animations, commenting on the forum and offering advice. This has led to a conservative staff base that is reluctant to change the game or go out of their way to do amazing things for players for fear of being criticized. I for one was pleased to see my staff animate for me. But it seems like the community drove out many hard-working staff members like Cayuga, Nergal, and Xalle because they either voiced their opinions too loudly or got burned out by doing things for players for no reward.

Role play:
As this game is an RPI you would expect the roleplay quality to be top notch. However it tends to hang around the mediocre level at best. Most players are playing a character which is good, but many characters seem to have goals of the player rather than their own goals. Male characters in particular are often looking for erotic roleplay which makes it hard to play a female character who wants to use their time productively.

Final verdict:
I have played for about a year and stopped in mid December with the holidays. I decided today that I would not be going back. This is bittersweet however as I can't say I didn't have fun at least some of the time I played. However most of the time it was unfortunately a slog. Many games are out there that offer intensive roleplay without the high barrier to entry imposed by the community or a lack of good game mechanics as imposed by the rigid skill system. I would suggest that you play Armageddon if you are interested in the setting but avoid the GDB (general discussion board), the alternate "shadowboard", or the Discord channel as these are places where the community is at its worst. If you must talk to people outside the game, keep it to the staff or to the helpers as they are mostly helpful.

Was this review helpful to you? 
(Updated: December 19, 2017)
Overall rating 
 
4.1
Game Mechanics 
 
3.5
Feature Set 
 
4.5
Game World 
 
4.0
Community 
 
3.5
Staff 
 
4.5
Role Play 
 
4.5

Still good after all these years.

Game mechanics: Armageddon was famous - or infamous - for its insanely powerful, world-changing long-list magick guilds. They split them all up into quadrants, so there no longer exists a full-on sorcerer, or wind mage, etc. Plus they eliminated the option to play shadow, void, and energy mages. They also now allow more people to play the quadrant-based mages, so it's not nearly as "special" as I feel it used to be, since now it seems as though everyone and their brother is either a known or secret mage. There are still dozens upon dozens of totally playable and fun options for play though, that don't revolve around magicks.

Feature set: lots of depth. There is a robust crafting system, the original DIKU-based combat system has been tweaked to better fit the RPI genre so it's still recognizeable to old-school hack-n-slash MUD fans but more RP-friendly. Mounts and wagons, hundreds of different skills - though through class/subclass options, you have to choose which skillsets your character will eventually "branch" and which he'll forgo. The help files on the main website are accessed easily through the search engine, with plenty of cross-referencing. And they are replicated in the game itself using "help "

Game world: There is a main city, a couple of main trade centers, some less-travelled trade centers, dozens of different hunting areas for those who want to hunt. There are lots of hidden spots, secret areas, places that can only be accessed in certain ways. There are also lots of coded and non-coded ways to earn your character's keep: join a clan, forage for stones/salt/food, get hired as an aide by a noble or templar and jump face-first into politics, form your own hunting crew or join someone else's, or join the criminal element and burglarize your way to fame and fortune. Characters can eventually rise in influence/wealth to become "important" whether in coded rank in a clan, or opening their own shop (which takes a LONG time and LOTS of work but it's definitely possible and has been done recently). Or you can just play a character who isn't trying to become important, but instead is just trying to survive and not starve to death or piss anyone off badly enough for them to get murdered. So plenty of options for movement and improvement from your character's first moments in the game til their death.

Community: this is a sore spot, but it's improved a bunch, at present. It has phases where it feels like drudgery to read the game forums. Usually it's just a couple or a few players who are hell-bent on finding fault, and will twist reality to fit their idea of "everything that's wrong with the game." Sometimes there really ARE things wrong with the game, but there are ways to seek resolution that don't involve pissing in everyone else's Cheerios. There are some people here, as in every game, who just want to piss in everyone's Cheerios. They do, they eventually get bored of it or the staff eventually shows them the door, and they go elsewhere to whine. Some of them even get tired of whining and return to the game. It's a very emotionally-driven game, so you have to expect a lot of passion among the players. While it's great that people care so deeply for Arm, it can be a curse at times, when things don't go the way a player was hoping it would go.

Staff: vastly improved from even as recent as a year ago. There has always been the steady thrum of solid, sensible, helpful, courteous staff members, but it has occasionally been interrupted with significantly unpleasant individuals. They weren't bad staffers necessarily. They were just really bad at the staff-player interaction game, and probably should've stayed in the background and let other staffers take over the player relations end of staffing. There've been a few doozies in the history of Armageddon, but you have to expect that with a game that's been running since the early 1990's.

Roleplay: I've played GemStone III, two MOOs, Legends of Future Past, a couple of DIKU RP-encouraged/enforced games, Armageddon, and the first incarnation of Shadows of Isuldur. Of all, I've found Armageddon's roleplay to be vastly superior. The emote system is detailed such that it's easy to really "put" yourself into your character and bring the game world to life. But at the same time, it's absolutely fine to simply nod, if that's all you feel your character would do. You aren't expected to throw out emotes for every little movement. You're just expected to try and make your character believable within the scope of the game's genre: post-apocalyptic desert planet with scary-magicks (as opposed to disney fairy godmother magicks) fantasy. Politics abound, whether you want to be a hero or antagonist, and there's plenty of both to latch on to, or to mentor your character. You never really know who your character's enemies are, sometimes not even at that one moment when you hear the death-BEEP and see the login screen saying "Welcome to Armageddon!" Pro-tip - death by assassination is infinitely more fun than death by mob #47934!

Was this review helpful to you? 
Overall rating 
 
4.4
Game Mechanics 
 
3.5
Feature Set 
 
5.0
Game World 
 
4.0
Community 
 
4.5
Staff 
 
4.5
Role Play 
 
5.0

A gritty role-playing environment.

This review is going to be quite short, but it'll go over the basics.

Game Mechanics [3.5]: The mechanics are pretty good in most cases, the only things that drag this score down are the crafting system, and the progression system. Crafting is fairly simple, nothing special about it or engaging, which is mostly okay. The main problem is the skill progression: it takes a lot of grinding to get your skills up, and when grinding is discouraged, it gets really confusing.

Feature Set [5]: Armageddon has plenty of in-depth features, even ones most people would never use, but they don't force barely any of them on you, which is nice.

Game World [4]: Zalanthas itself is a harsh, gritty environment, and the game world does an awesome job of displaying that. The only problem is that the world is too small. In my opinion, the staff should increase the size, and try to bring in more people to make the experience more interesting.

Community [4.5]: Armageddon's community is /generally/ very helpful, the players will all usually act like their characters would, but from what I've heard from other people, there seems to be a few bad eggs.

Staff [4.5]: The majority of the staff are friendly and helpful (especially Akariel,) sometimes they may avoid an issue or suggestion or some such, but that's only human nature.

Role Play [5]: This is where Armageddon absolutely shines. Even when you're grinding your skills you're usually role-playing. Armageddon provides all the tools you may possibly want for role-playing, and then drops in the perfect community for it.

Was this review helpful to you? 
View all user reviews